Why ‘Veere di Wedding’ has me scratching my Feminist head!

Here’s the thing. I want to love Veere di Wedding. I really do. Especially when I see the trailer on Youtube trolled by Hindtards who think it is non-sanskaari for women to swear or talk about sex. I want to love it just to piss off those who move to boycott the movie because the actors denounced the Kathua rape. But, despite the motivations, the glitzy marketing, and the glam hashtags, I have a very bad feeling about the movie, and its relationship with the Feminist movement. Here is why ‘Veere di Wedding’ has me scratching my feminist head

Female Lead Cast = Feminism (Not)

It is very exciting that the movie is headlined by the women of the industry. Not a single alpha male super-star is present to ‘bolster’ the efforts of these women. They are the alpha in the movie. But clearly, we have our feminism metrics set super low if that is all we need for a movie to be called Feminist. The stars of the movie have gone out of the way to remind you that this is #notachickflick. Because that would be so bad, right? This movie is trying to be feminist by calling itself a #broflick instead.

Even for female friendships to count, they have to strongly resemble male friendships.

That sounds like a trope and makes me super nervous about what the movie might actually turn out to be. 

Why is it still about men?

Almost every frame in the trailer shows four strong, independent, ‘hoes-for-life’, constantly discussing why they don’t need men. I belong to a group of six thick-as-thieves women. I can’t, for the life of me, remember the last time we discussed men, want or not! Newsflash, women’s lives are not orbiting 24*7 on loving or hating men. We talk weather, films, furniture, travel, and politics – like all other humans.

Even in their conspicuous absence, men are still the central theme of the Veere di Wedding trailer.

Knock, knock, is there feminism in there? I have a nagging doubt this might fail the Bechdel test. 


Also read: Bechdel Test in 2017: Why movies still fail the test?


I read an article on the topic that angrily defended Veere by comparing the movie to Dil Chahta Hai and Zindagi Milegi Na Dobara. But, you see, that is the problem. Those two cult movies made ‘friendship’ the hero of the story, not the feelings the protagonists had for the other sex.

In many ways, Veere looks like the female version of Pyar ka Punchnama, which was just a poorly made, misogynistic crap-box that I did not want to see remade in any shape or form. 

P.S: One of the most meaningful portrayals of female friendship in cinema, in the recent years, was Angry Indian Goddesses. That felt real, relatable, and feminist, to my mind. 

Feminism isn’t Switching Genders on Misogyny

Remember when they took the misogynistic idea of the housewife as the slave and server of the master, switched the genders, and made Ki & Ka. That wasn’t feminism. Two years hence, they took the barf-worthy, misogynistic Honey Singh/Badshah item number, switched the genders, and shot the Tareefan video. It is still not feminism.

I would urge Kareena Kapoor to Google feminism before selling it – but she makes too much money to care. 

Yes, Feminism doesn’t need to be boring, Swara. Feminism doesn’t need to be serious. I am dying to see a great, fun, light-hearted Bollywood movie on female friendship that is relatable and feminist. But what I have seen of Veere till now, doesn’t seem to be delivering. It doesn’t need to vehemently shy away from being a chick flick to be Feminist, guys. The Sisterhood of the Travelling Pants was a chick flick. And it was feminist to boot. I cross my fingers, but so far not so good Veere!

 

 

About Anumita Ghosh

Anumita believes her calling has to do with the written words. She loves to write and read, and has recently given up a(n) (almost) rocking career in the Corporate to pursue her passion. Yes, she is slightly off her rocker, but then the society has been largely accepting of her madness. She is the co-founder of Blank Slate Chronicles and a struggling domestic apprentice, not to mention a loving (yet inadequately skilled) mother to a toddler.

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Anumita Ghosh

Anumita believes her calling has to do with the written words. She loves to write and read, and has recently given up a(n) (almost) rocking career in the Corporate to pursue her passion. Yes, she is slightly off her rocker, but then the society has been largely accepting of her madness. She is the co-founder of Blank Slate Chronicles and a struggling domestic apprentice, not to mention a loving (yet inadequately skilled) mother to a toddler.

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