Trending Hobbies of India’s Youth

College goers are always the trendsetters of a society. They are young, adventurous, and have a streak of rebellion, that serves well when trying new things. This is also the time to gather the most exciting life experiences, that become a person’s tool box to navigate adult life. It is, therefore, a time to explore vocations beyond the curriculum, for a rounded personality development. Over the years, youngsters have had evolving tastes in how they want to spend their time beyond course work. Today, millenials enjoy some unique hobbies. Here is an interesting list of trending hobbies among youth in the country:

Street Dance

It is a dance style that evolved outside dance studios, regardless of country or origin. Places like street, parties, open available spaces, nightclubs etc., are the hub of street dance, in its various forms. Street Dance in usually improv, and involves interaction with the audience, and other dancers. The dance includes styles like hip hop, b-boying, the funk style, popping and locking etc. While street dance was popularized by African-Americans, today the culture has pervaded beyond the community. Street dancing does not follow principles of gestures and postures in the traditional sense. It incorporates the basic strength and flexibility of the dancer.

In recent times, college fests in India have been hosting street dance battles.

“What I like most about street dancing is the swag factor, which is not found in any other dance form. Also, it is relatable to our day to day lives,” said Tishya Chakrobarty, an enthusiastic and popular street dancer from an esteemed university in Kolkata.

Street Play/ Nukkad/ Street Theater

It is a form of theatrical performance, that is staged in outdoor public places, without specific paying audience. The spaces can be anywhere ranging from parks, open spaces, roads etc. Street play began in the early 20th century, as a tool to emancipate the working class and reinforce revolution against the established higher class.The nuance of ‘Nukkad’ is the the overwhelming energy in the entire act. The catchy lyrics of the background songs, crisp script and occasional accompaniment of musical instruments, make sure that the audience are glued to the entire act. Street play or Nukkad typically addresses social issues. The street play actors choose their venue in such a way that they can confront and engage with the public or the spectators.

Due to rising popularity and involvement of masses, street plays have evolved as one of the major forms of entertainment in colleges in India. Street play teaches team work as a single act requires actors, musicians, script writers, lyricists, and photographers to come together synchronously.

According to Ankit Bhattacharya, “Street plays are much more intimate, brief, and direct.” Susmit Bannerjee, another street play enthusiast said, “The act should not be dull. The elements of the act should be larger than life – incorporating monologues, instruments and loads of energy.”

Sounak Nandi cited a difference between Nukkad and classical theatres, ” Nukkads are for social awareness. Dialogues are catchy, even provocative. The issue takes precedence over the story”

The lack of propriety in street theater, as compared to the classical format, adds to its appeal among students.

Beatboxing (b-boxing)

It is a form of vocal percussion primarily involving the art of mimicking drum machines, using one’s mouth, lips, tongue and voice – but no intruments. It also includes vocal imitation of musical instruments.

The term “beatboxing” is derived from the mimicry of early drum machines, known as beat boxes.

Wise (first to include proliferation) and Swifty (first to implement the inhale sound technique) inspired an entire new fan base of human beatboxers .

The internet has played a major role in the popularity of modern beatboxing. Its current popularity is due to release from artists such as Rahzel, Reeps one and Alem.

Sometimes, modern beatboxers will use their hand or another part of their body to extend the spectrum of sound effects and rhythm. Some have developed the technique that involves blowing and sucking air around fingers to produce a very realistic record scratching noise known as ‘crab scratch’.

About Manaswita Saha

Manaswita is an engineering student, and loves to travel. She is an avid reader and has flair for writing. She is the youngest and spunkiest Blank Slater yet!

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